Classic Sculptures Dressed in Modern Outfits by Léo Caillard

“French photographer Léo Caillard teamed up with French art director Alexis Persani to dress ancient Louvre’s sculptures into something more trendy and up-to-date.

To create ‘Street Stone’, Caillard first photographed the statues and his friends in similar poses. Then Persani stacked the shots on top of each other in Photoshop, erasing everything but the clothes from the top layer.

By contrasting modern and classical culture, the creative duo wanted to show that society has undergone a big change and continues changing. The results are hilarious! It also shows that clothes have an enormous impact on the way one is perceived.”

Retouching : Alexis Persani
Photography & conception : Léo Caillard

 

visit the gallery here

Kinetic String Sculpture by Daniel Palacios

The interactive structure responds to movement in both a visual and an audible manner.

The number of people that are present within the same room and their level of activity and motion directly affects the vigor with which the motors spin. An increase in population and motion results in increasing speeds of the turbines which causes the rope to form different visible shapes. The escalating speed of the twirling rope also prompts a thunderous whirring noise that is hard to miss. Check out the video, below, to get an idea of the different shapes formed and sounds emitted by the structure.

This project, called Waves, is part of an international group exhibition called Visualizing Sound currently showing at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre through June 25, 2012.

More about the artist 

Daniel Palacios creates machines that can scan and visualise the flow of visitors (Waves, 2006-07), or objects that communicate with their viewers by means of artificial intelligence (Kill the process, 2010). These are works that create snapshots of reality and pose questions about perception, memory, time and space.

Viewed in terms of form alone, they are interactive artworks consisting of complexly functioning machinery with scarcely comprehensible software components. Beyond such technical aspects, however, the artist’s works are stirring inasmuch as they are concerned with extremely human, philosophical questions.

Palacios searches for forms with which to represent reality, i.e. he traces movements made, time that has passed or the process of human memory. In Whatever happened Happened(2010), for example, he designs an apparatus to represent the visitors’ movements within the exhibition space in the form of tree rings. A new ring is added every day of the exhibition, and like a tree that bends towards the sun, the rings recorded move in the direction of the flow of visitors. The fascination of Palacios’s works derives from such intuitively comprehensible spatial images and experiences, as well as the discrepancy between technical precision and a subjective reproduction and perception of reality.

— From the text ‘How real is reality?’ by Nora Mayr. Translated from German by Lucinda Rennison.

The work of Josh Holinaty and Luke Ramsey

by Josh Holinaty and Luke Ramsey, July 2010,

painted with Golden acrylic paints
10010- 105 St, Edmonton John Howard Society Building, Alberta, Canada.
Project produced by the Edmonton Small Press Association.
Supported by the Edmonton John Howard Society and a team of assistants.
Funded by a community mural grant from the Edmonton Arts Council.
The giant on the right comes from a land of mass consumption and waste. His body is made-up of junk, trash and random man-made objects. He feels burdened by the weight of his load and feels stress and fear because of it. The giant on the left is showing compassion for her new friend. She comes from a land of green space and an abundance of nature. Her body is made-up of rivers, animals, and vegetation. As a gesture of support and understanding, she calmly puts her hand on the other giant’s shoulder. He’s feeling a little nervous about the change, but a positive transition begins to spread- a change that shares a common ground between the two. Their faces come together and form a complete circle, because they are in harmony with each other.
This mural won an award of excellence from The City of Edmonton. The ceremony was at a gala in City Hall, November 10th, 2011.

A Sculpture Made of Sound

Documentation:
http://vimeo.com/38505448

The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating
a moving sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For
our work we asked a dancer to visualize a musical piece (Kreukeltape by
Machinenfabriek) as closely as possible by movements of her body. She was
recorded by three depth cameras (Kinect), in which the intersection of the
images was later put together to a three-dimensional volume (3d point cloud),
so we were able to use the collected data throughout the further process.
The three-dimensional image allowed us a completely free handling of the
digital camera, without limitations of the perspective. The camera also reacts
to the sound and supports the physical imitation of the musical piece by the
performer. She moves to a noise field, where a simple modification of the
random seed can consistently create new versions of the video, each offering
a different composition of the recorded performance. The multi-dimensionality
of the sound sculpture is already contained in every movement of the dancer,
as the camera footage allows any imaginable perspective.

The body – constant and indefinite at the same time – “bursts” the space
already with its mere physicality, creating a first distinction between the self
and its environment. Only the body movements create a reference to the
otherwise invisible space, much like the dots bounce on the ground to give it
a physical dimension. Thus, the sound-dance constellation in the video does
not only simulate a purely virtual space. The complex dynamics of the body
movements is also strongly self-referential. With the complex quasi-static,
inconsistent forms the body is “painting”, a new reality space emerges whose
simulated aesthetics goes far beyond numerical codes.

Similar to painting, a single point appears to be still very abstract, but the
more points are connected to each other, the more complex and concrete
the image seems. The more perfect and complex the “alternative worlds” we
project (Vilém Flusser) and the closer together their point elements, the more
tangible they become. A digital body, consisting of 22 000 points, thus seems
so real that it comes to life again.
text: Sandra Moskova

nominated for the for the MuVi Award:
http://www.kurzfilmtage.de/en/competitions/muvi-award/selection.html

see video in full quallity:
www.daniel-franke.com/unnamed_soundsculpture.mov

HQ Stills
http://www.flickr.com/photos/37752604@N05/sets/72157629203600952/