Dripping Rain Cloud at Nuart Festival 2012

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Classic Sculptures Dressed in Modern Outfits by Léo Caillard

“French photographer Léo Caillard teamed up with French art director Alexis Persani to dress ancient Louvre’s sculptures into something more trendy and up-to-date.

To create ‘Street Stone’, Caillard first photographed the statues and his friends in similar poses. Then Persani stacked the shots on top of each other in Photoshop, erasing everything but the clothes from the top layer.

By contrasting modern and classical culture, the creative duo wanted to show that society has undergone a big change and continues changing. The results are hilarious! It also shows that clothes have an enormous impact on the way one is perceived.”

Retouching : Alexis Persani
Photography & conception : Léo Caillard

 

visit the gallery here

New York Subway Riders Getting Lost in a Good Book

With the almost near domination of electronics in our reading habits, it’s good to see that people still enjoy the company of a good old paper and ink. I’m one of those who enjoy a good read, but sadly I made the shift to electronic reading with my e-ink Kindle device.

There is something about paper books that will always live. Here’s a set of pictures of people reading on the subway

pictures via mymodernmet.com

HUMANÆ – PANTONE® HUMAN SWATCHES

Brazilian artist Angelica Dass created the visually stunning project Humanæ, where she matches skin tone to a PANTONE® color. The ongoing portraiture project takes a sample of 11×11 pixels of the model’s face and then matches it to the exact PANTONE® tone. The background is then dyed to the exact tone. You could say the result is a color “HUE”MAN (ha!)?

Read more at Design Milk: http://design-milk.com/humanae-pantone%c2%ae-human-swatches/#ixzz21plYlUXn

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Kinetic String Sculpture by Daniel Palacios

The interactive structure responds to movement in both a visual and an audible manner.

The number of people that are present within the same room and their level of activity and motion directly affects the vigor with which the motors spin. An increase in population and motion results in increasing speeds of the turbines which causes the rope to form different visible shapes. The escalating speed of the twirling rope also prompts a thunderous whirring noise that is hard to miss. Check out the video, below, to get an idea of the different shapes formed and sounds emitted by the structure.

This project, called Waves, is part of an international group exhibition called Visualizing Sound currently showing at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre through June 25, 2012.

More about the artist 

Daniel Palacios creates machines that can scan and visualise the flow of visitors (Waves, 2006-07), or objects that communicate with their viewers by means of artificial intelligence (Kill the process, 2010). These are works that create snapshots of reality and pose questions about perception, memory, time and space.

Viewed in terms of form alone, they are interactive artworks consisting of complexly functioning machinery with scarcely comprehensible software components. Beyond such technical aspects, however, the artist’s works are stirring inasmuch as they are concerned with extremely human, philosophical questions.

Palacios searches for forms with which to represent reality, i.e. he traces movements made, time that has passed or the process of human memory. In Whatever happened Happened(2010), for example, he designs an apparatus to represent the visitors’ movements within the exhibition space in the form of tree rings. A new ring is added every day of the exhibition, and like a tree that bends towards the sun, the rings recorded move in the direction of the flow of visitors. The fascination of Palacios’s works derives from such intuitively comprehensible spatial images and experiences, as well as the discrepancy between technical precision and a subjective reproduction and perception of reality.

— From the text ‘How real is reality?’ by Nora Mayr. Translated from German by Lucinda Rennison.