HUMANÆ – PANTONE® HUMAN SWATCHES

Brazilian artist Angelica Dass created the visually stunning project Humanæ, where she matches skin tone to a PANTONE® color. The ongoing portraiture project takes a sample of 11×11 pixels of the model’s face and then matches it to the exact PANTONE® tone. The background is then dyed to the exact tone. You could say the result is a color “HUE”MAN (ha!)?

Read more at Design Milk: http://design-milk.com/humanae-pantone%c2%ae-human-swatches/#ixzz21plYlUXn

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Fulvio di Piazza’s Mysterious Surreal World

Fulvio di Piazza is a Sicilian artist who specializes in surreal oil paintings, a selection of which, entitled Ashes to Ashes, will be on display at the New York showspace in his first solo exhibition in the United States. His current imagery includes fantastical volcanic landscapes with floating islands and re-shaped land masses forming heads & creatures, among other things – all rendered in a impressive level of detail and depth. This series was inspired by the by the 1980 book Entropy, written by an American economist named Jeremy Rifkin, in which he associates thermodynamic activity with sociological patterns of economic and environmental decline. The piece above is for the Unnatural-Natural History exhibition at the Royal Academy West of England opening in Bristol on July 14, while the images below are for the aforementioned NYC show opening tonight.

via Arrested Motion

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Kinetic String Sculpture by Daniel Palacios

The interactive structure responds to movement in both a visual and an audible manner.

The number of people that are present within the same room and their level of activity and motion directly affects the vigor with which the motors spin. An increase in population and motion results in increasing speeds of the turbines which causes the rope to form different visible shapes. The escalating speed of the twirling rope also prompts a thunderous whirring noise that is hard to miss. Check out the video, below, to get an idea of the different shapes formed and sounds emitted by the structure.

This project, called Waves, is part of an international group exhibition called Visualizing Sound currently showing at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre through June 25, 2012.

More about the artist 

Daniel Palacios creates machines that can scan and visualise the flow of visitors (Waves, 2006-07), or objects that communicate with their viewers by means of artificial intelligence (Kill the process, 2010). These are works that create snapshots of reality and pose questions about perception, memory, time and space.

Viewed in terms of form alone, they are interactive artworks consisting of complexly functioning machinery with scarcely comprehensible software components. Beyond such technical aspects, however, the artist’s works are stirring inasmuch as they are concerned with extremely human, philosophical questions.

Palacios searches for forms with which to represent reality, i.e. he traces movements made, time that has passed or the process of human memory. In Whatever happened Happened(2010), for example, he designs an apparatus to represent the visitors’ movements within the exhibition space in the form of tree rings. A new ring is added every day of the exhibition, and like a tree that bends towards the sun, the rings recorded move in the direction of the flow of visitors. The fascination of Palacios’s works derives from such intuitively comprehensible spatial images and experiences, as well as the discrepancy between technical precision and a subjective reproduction and perception of reality.

— From the text ‘How real is reality?’ by Nora Mayr. Translated from German by Lucinda Rennison.