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Yesterday a car did a burn-out in my street. It was noisy and disruptive and smelly and offensive.

I could see the car doing it. I could read the registration number. And I thought: if I was wearing Google Glasses right now, I could record this. And then perhaps pass it onto the police for them to follow up. Or post to YouTube for the audiences who like that type of thing.

I’m excited by Google Glasses.

I love the idea of easily being able to capture and share images and video. This includes sharing imagery with others live.

But I’m also pondering what could go wrong.

If Google Glasses become widely used, there’s potential for a massive impact on our behaviour and in particular the way we interact with each other.

Imagine somebody wearing Google glasses and sharing their experience while they’re:

  • being sanctioned in the workplace
  • in a…

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The 20 most-watched TED Talks to date

 

From education to brain function to inspiring messages to techno-possibilities, this list represents quite a breadth of topics.

  1. Sir Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity (2006): 13,409,417 views
  2. Jill Bolte Taylor‘s stroke of insight (2008): 10,409,851
  3. Pranav Mistry on the thrilling potential of SixthSense (2009): 9,223,263
  4. David Gallo‘s underwater astonishments (2007): 7,879,541
  5. Pattie Maes and Pranav Mistry demo SixthSense (2009): 7,467,580
  6. Tony Robbins asks Why we do what we do (2006): 6,879,488
  7. Simon Sinek on how great leaders inspire action (2010): 6,050,294
  8. Steve Jobs on how to live before you die (2005): 5,444,022
  9. Hans Rosling shows the best stats you’ve ever seen (2006): 4,966,643
  10. Brene Brown talks about the power of vulnerability (2010): 4,763,038
  11. Daniel Pink on the surprising science of motivation (2009): 4,706,241
  12. Arthur Benjamin does mathemagic (2005): 4,658,425
  13. Elizabeth Gilbert on nurturing your genius (2009): 4,538,037
  14. Dan Gilbert asks: Why are we happy? (2004): 4,269,082
  15. Stephen Hawking asks big questions about the universe (2008): 4,153,105
  16. Jeff Han demos his breakthrough multi-touchscreen (2006): 3,891,251
  17. Johnny Lee shows Wii Remote hacks for educators (2008): 3,869,417
  18. Keith Barry does brain magic (2004): 3,847,893
  19. Mary Roach 10 things you didn’t know about orgasm (2009): 3,810,630
  20. Vijay Kumar demos robots that fly like birds (2012): 3,535,340

Source TED BLOG

Classic Sculptures Dressed in Modern Outfits by Léo Caillard

“French photographer Léo Caillard teamed up with French art director Alexis Persani to dress ancient Louvre’s sculptures into something more trendy and up-to-date.

To create ‘Street Stone’, Caillard first photographed the statues and his friends in similar poses. Then Persani stacked the shots on top of each other in Photoshop, erasing everything but the clothes from the top layer.

By contrasting modern and classical culture, the creative duo wanted to show that society has undergone a big change and continues changing. The results are hilarious! It also shows that clothes have an enormous impact on the way one is perceived.”

Retouching : Alexis Persani
Photography & conception : Léo Caillard

 

visit the gallery here

New York Subway Riders Getting Lost in a Good Book

With the almost near domination of electronics in our reading habits, it’s good to see that people still enjoy the company of a good old paper and ink. I’m one of those who enjoy a good read, but sadly I made the shift to electronic reading with my e-ink Kindle device.

There is something about paper books that will always live. Here’s a set of pictures of people reading on the subway

pictures via mymodernmet.com